Should Doctors Have a Mandatory Retirement Age?

Should Doctors Have a Mandatory Retirement Age?

Healthcare Blog
Competency is the foundation of sound clinical practice and is essential to preserving the lives of patients.  However, unlike many other critical professions like airline pilots, air traffic controllers and law enforcement officials, the medical profession does not mandate that physicians of a certain age retire.  There is considerable evidence that physician fitness does degrade following age 65; a 2005 report by Khaliq, et al, found that physicians who have served for forty years or more had a 6.6% likelihood of receiving some form of disciplinary action as opposed to the 1.3% rate among those with only ten years of service. With the wellbeing of patients at stake, many within the healthcare community have argued that there should be a mandatory retirement age for physicians. There is a significant legal…
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How Relevant are Online Reviews for Doctors?

How Relevant are Online Reviews for Doctors?

Healthcare Blog
In the 21st century virtually everything is subject to online reviews. While these opinions can be helpful in determining the next car or television you purchase, there is considerably more at stake when you choose a physician.  If you are looking merely at the number of stars a physician has on sites like Ratemds.com or Healthgrades.com, you may be missing out on a medical expert who has provided decades of exceptional care. Like any profession, there are physicians who are less successful than others, but when determining the type of care you and your family are likely to receive, a one to five star rating system is hardly the most insightful and comprehensive way of measuring competency. Before you entrust you and your family’s health with a new physician, it…
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Balancing Privacy and Transparency in Patient Relationships

Balancing Privacy and Transparency in Patient Relationships

Healthcare Blog
As more physicians adopt advanced technology tools to streamline administrative and clinical duties, there is likely to be some loss in patient confidentiality. New systems like Electronic Health Records, telemedicine and mobile health apps may offer more patients greater access to their medical information, but these tools are hardly perfected.  Increasing patient access also potentially exposes personal information to employers, insurance companies, and various criminal elements.  Access to Personal Information For many physicians who value their patients’ right to privacy, there may be some resistance to transitioning to a completely digital workplace, and it would appear that most patients support them in their unwillingness to adopt these new services.  According to a 2014 HRI survey, more than 70% of respondents prioritized data security regarding medical tests and doctor’s advice over…
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Strategies for Improving Quality of Care

Strategies for Improving Quality of Care

Healthcare Blog
The quality of healthcare in the U.S. is at the center of a raging debate shaping the future of the industry.  With a total annual expenditure of almost $3 trillion, the healthcare industry should be providing better outcomes than it currently produces.  A recent Commonwealth Fund study found that the U.S. ranked last among eleven developed nations—including New Zealand and Canada—in healthcare quality. Behind this poor showing are the common culprits like criminal waste and inefficiency, bloated government agencies and medical groups, and poorly implemented public policies.  These issues can be overwhelming in their scope, but taken at the institutional or departmental level, they can be much more manageable.   Optimal Process Management Healthcare is inherently a team process with physicians orchestrating a number of professionals, while also adhering to policies…
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